Passion Week: A Silent Saturday Reflection

Scripture for Today 

Remember my affliction and my wanderings, the wormwood and the gall!  My soul continually remembers it and is bowed down within me. But this I call to mind, and therefore I have hope: The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases; his mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is your faithfulness. “The Lord is my portion,” says my soul, “therefore I will hope in him.” The Lord is good to those who wait for him, to the soul who seeks him. Lamentations 3:19-24 ESV

And after you have suffered a little while, the God of all grace, who has called you to his eternal glory in Christ, will himself restore, confirm, strengthen, and establish you. 1 Peter 5:10 ESV

Things to Think About

There seems to be confusion everywhere on the correct path to take regarding this pandemic. Even between family and friends the information isn’t quite the same. What is the truth? What is real? Who do we believe?  

It feels oddly familiar to what we read in scripture around Holy Week.  On Palm Sunday they are shouting “Hosanna, Hosanna.” On Friday some of the same voices are heard yelling, “crucify him, crucify him”, and on Saturday, it’s silent.  The people are confused, the information is different between family and friends. What is the truth that just happened? What is real? Who do they believe?

We often don’t give space for the Saturday between Good Friday and Easter Sunday.  Never before has the concept of this silence of Saturday meant so much.  

Max Lucado writes: “On Saturday, Jesus is silent. So is God. He made himself heard on Friday.  He tore the curtains of the temple, opened the graves of the dead, rocked the earth, blocked the sun of the sky, and sacrificed the Son of Heaven. Earth heard much of God on Friday. Nothing on Saturday.  Jesus is silent.  God is silent.  Saturday is silent.”

To some, this experience of life right now, may seem like a Saturday that forgot to end.  Saturday’s silence torments us. God feels silent, Jesus feels silent and far away. We are stuck in the liminal space between what we knew before and wondering what is to come. For most of us there is a level of suffering we are experiencing – A sort of collective grieving in what has been lost.  Our way of life, graduations, weddings, a chance to gather to say final good-byes to loved ones. All is different.  All is unfamiliar and yet familiar. We are set still by the silence of our world around us. It’s unnerving. Our suffering is palatable and so we sit, waiting. Waiting for our Sunday to arrive.

 

About the Author: Marnee Alfson is an EMDR trained trauma specialist in private practice in Vancouver, WA.  Marnee received her training under the direction of leading author and developer of Story Informed Trauma Therapy (SITT), Byron Kehler, MS. She has worked with survivors of various traumas such as sexual and/or domestic assault, displacement, first responders, attachment in relationships, body image, life transitions and mood management.

She believes we gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience we choose to walk through.  Trauma recovery therapy is an important part of hope in helping other survivors live their lives free of the pain they have experienced.

Passion Week: A Good Friday Reflection

Scripture for Today

45 Now from the sixth hour there was darkness over all the land until the ninth hour.46 And about the ninth hour Jesus cried out with a loud voice, saying, “Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?” that is, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” 47 And some of the bystanders, hearing it, said, “This man is calling Elijah.” 48 And one of them at once ran and took a sponge, filled it with sour wine, and put it on a reed and gave it to him to drink. 49 But the others said, “Wait, let us see whether Elijah will come to save him.” 50 And Jesus cried out again with a loud voice and yielded up his spirit. 51 And behold, the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. And the earth shook, and the rocks were split. 52 The tombs also were opened. And many bodies of the saints who had fallen asleep were raised, 53 and coming out of the tombs after his resurrection they went into the holy city and appeared to many. 54 When the centurion and those who were with him, keeping watch over Jesus, saw the earthquake and what took place, they were filled with awe and said, “Truly this was the Son of God!”  Matthew 27:45-54 (ESV).

So if there is any encouragement in Christ, any comfort from love, any participation in the Spirit, any affection and sympathy, complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others. Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. Philippians 2:1-8 (ESV)

 

Things to Think About

Good Friday has long been my very favorite day of the year. That might sound strange, but I thrive at night amid the dark, quiet church services where light and shadow dance together on the sanctuary walls surrounding each waxy candle. The whole theme of the day is so reflective and real, and my melancholy heart is drawn to the familiar beauty of a wounded healer. A suffering savior.

This year, though, I find myself resisting the story altogether. It isn’t that I disbelieve or don’t find it meaningful, but it’s just so…heavy. Good Friday in the midst of a pandemic isn’t exactly a walk through the park (are those even allowed anymore?). I’m tired from reading daily stories about death and suffering. My heart feels spent from keeping up with the news cycle and worrying about the people I love: Wondering if we’ll all have food, if my friends can pay their rent, if the nurses will have masks. I sob imagining the lonely memorials as people bury their loved ones at a time when no one is allowed to come together; not allowed to hug or hold hands. There is so much pain all around us, and yet we are isolated. Tired. Reading the detailed account of one more death today feels like it just might break me. 

Maybe you feel the same. I don’t know where your heart is today, but I can bet it is heavy. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if many of our prayers sound a bit like Jesus’ prayer on the cross:

“My God, My God, why have You forsaken me?” 

Oof. Take a deep breath as you read those words. Can you believe they were said by JESUS, the Messiah, the King of Kings and Lord of Lords, the celebrated Christmas Babe… The Savior of the world? 

My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?

This haunting prayer was a quote from and a reference to Psalm 22, a Psalm of David, which Jesus and his onlookers would have known by heart. It is an aching hymn about physical and emotional, existential suffering, crying out to God in unflinching desperation. This is a song my own heart knows all too well, and I am shaken by the knowledge that Jesus understands. 

Reflecting on the details of the gory lynching of the 33 year old God-man, Jesus, might be too much for us today as we stumble our way through both the shared and solitary traumas of life during a pandemic. But maybe we can find comfort and rest for our worn-through souls by knowing that whatever the details of our own reality right now: God understands. 

Jesus showed us on the cross that he is not afraid of our violent terrors or hidden cries, because he cried them, too. He is not afraid of the darkness because he took darkness into himself, bearing the crushing weight of all the sin of all mankind. God is not afraid of our questions, confusion, or doubt. He is not disgusted by our shame, and he isn’t surprised or taken aback by the constant, gnawing frailty of our humanness.

In fact. He welcomes it all. He welcomes us.

The cross of Christ is an altar, a monument, a welcome sign. It is a testament of love and a dark symbol of a bright reality: Jesus came to be with us, no matter the cost us, and he understands the way we feel. 

Take another deep breath, my friends: 

Jesus understands, and God is near.

 

About the Author: Alyssa Zimmerman, like you, is incredibly loved by God. She anxiously offers up her cynicism, fear, and mustard-seed-faith in return. Constantly amazed by grace and relieved by redemption, Alyssa pursues truth, love, justice and Jesus in the midst of disabling chronic pain which has shaped the vast majority of her life and foiled her dreams for college, career, and a family. Instead, Alyssa became a high school dropout, living in poverty and pain, forced to spend most days in bed with an icepack. Nevertheless, she is committed to the great and messy work of therapy and mental health, wishing deep-down healing and wholeness for all.

At home among the trees, the mountains, and the drizzling rain, Alyssa is a PNW native. She is passionate about living vulnerably, wrestling with the hard questions of faith, and pushing beyond the confines of our modern western evangelical culture in the hope of better understanding the fullness of God’s love and more indiscriminately extending it to all. She is a great lover of wit and silence, watcher of documentaries, drinker of tea, and excessive taker of mediocre phone pics.

Passion Week: A Holy Thursday Reflection

Scripture for Today

“The blood will be a sign for you on the houses where you are, and when I see the blood, I will pass over you. No destructive plague will touch you when I strike Egypt.” Exodus 12:13

“Then he took a cup, and when he had given thanks, he gave it to them, saying, “Drink from it, all of you. This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins. I tell you, I will not drink from this fruit of the vine from now on until that day when I drink it new with you in my Father’s kingdom.”  Mathew 26:27-29

Things to Think About

As we reflect on Jesus’ last meal and betrayal this Holy Thursday, and anticipate his sacrifice and resurrection, may we also take into consideration the great significance of this day in the lives of God’s chosen people. As written in the book of Exodus, God delivered the Isrealites from captivity hundreds of years prior to Jesus’ coming. Not only was Jesus anticipating his own death on this night, he was also celebrating his father’s sovereignty and provision. 

We as Christians refer to Jesus’ last meal as The Last Supper, but for hundreds of years the Jewish people revered it and celebrated it as Passover. They practice Seder, a meal where each dish symbolically reflects the food the Isrealites ate while fleeing Egypt. The holiday takes place every year and is one of the single most important days of the Jewish calendar. It is referenced throughout the Bible and is notably referred to when young Jesus travels to Jerusalem to celebrate Passover with his family, gets lost, and is found in the temple talking theology with some religious leaders. But that’s a different story (albeit a great one).

The point is this: Passover was extremely important to the Jewish people, including Jesus and his disciples (who were also Jewish). 

Why is this significant? 

I think there are many reasons, but here are a few to think about:

    • The holiday symbolizes deliverance and celebrates God’s provision and sovereignty. It’s no coincidence that Jesus decides to publicly announce that he will sacrifice himself for the forgiveness of sins on Passover. God’s timing is always perfect. 
    • Jesus talking about the wine and bread on this night were normal and expected – They were significant parts of the traditional Passover meal. Where it starts to get weird is when Jesus goes off script and refers to them as the blood and body. The disciples were taken aback by Jesus’ additions to the traditional Passover language, but we often refer to them when taking communion or celebrating the Eucharist.
    • I used to wonder why the disciples didn’t recognize Jesus was about to die after he asked them to all get together for dinner to chat about God’s covenant, bread, and wine. It seemed obvious to me that this was his “farewell” meal. I now understand that this wasn’t a random get-together in an upper room to pour some wine and eat some bread. It was completely expected – Like a family gathering on Thanksgiving or Christmas.
    • God’s covenant and Old Testament scripture references were fresh in the minds of Jesus’ listening disciples. They knew what Jesus was talking about when he references God’s covenant to His people; on this night more than ever.
    • Jesus knew he was going to die the next day. He knew he would be betrayed by someone he loved that night. But he celebrated Passover and remembered God’s provision anyway. He praised God alongside his friends despite an internal knowledge of the future. He taught despite fear. He served despite suffering.

Today, let us do the same. Let us praise God for his deliverance and sovereignty despite our own fear, suffering, or struggles facing the world today. Let us remember God’s faithfulness on this Holy Thursday, just as Jesus did. Let us wonder about His perfect timing and trust that it will continue.

About the Author: Maya DaSilva is a high school sophomore who just got her driver’s license but rarely remembers where the keys are.

She enjoys wondering about how faith and culture intersect, and believes thinking leads to change – Even when we don’t have all the answers. 

She thinks quiet voices are still meant to be heard. 

Passion Week: A Palm Sunday Reflection

Scripture for Today

“Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion! Shout aloud, O daughter of Jerusalem! Behold, your king is coming to you;righteous and having salvation is he, humble and mounted on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey.” Zechariah 9:9 (ESV)

“The next day the large crowd that had come to the feast heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem. So they took branches of palm trees and went out to meet him, crying out, “Hosanna! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord, even the King of Israel!” And Jesus found a young donkey and sat on it, just as it is written, ‘Fear not, daughter of Zion; behold, your king is coming, sitting on a donkey’s colt!’ His disciples did not understand these things at first, but when Jesus was glorified, then they remembered that these things had been written about him and had been done to him. The crowd that had been with him when he called Lazarus out of the tomb and raised him from the dead continued to bear witness. The reason why the crowd went to meet him was that they heard he had done this sign.” John 12:12-18

 

Things to Think About

The prophet Zechariah foretold what was coming more than 500 years before Jesus entered Jerusalem. Branches waved and people cheered for the the man riding into town on a donkey. 

As much as Palm Sunday is supposed to be a celebration, I feel somewhat pained and contemplative when it comes each year.

The truth is, those same people who welcomed the king may have been the very ones who chanted to free Barabbas and ogle at Jesus’ death only days later. They called him “Hosanna” and blessed him upon arrival, but mocked him at his crucifixion.

Many of God’s people praised the man who’d just raised Lazarus from the dead, but completely missed their Messiah. 

And it makes me wonder what we’re missing, too – What we may misinterpret, misunderstand, and shout from the bandwagon just because it’s what others are doing. How may we, too, be misguided – Looking for the king of signs and wonders – the God of provision – but missing the miracle of His sacrifice and salvation?

So today, on Palm Sunday, let’s ask the tough questions. Let’s do the hard study. Let’s spend time with the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit as we seek to understand who He truly is.

Let’s know the King who rides into our lives asking that we give Him in His rightful place. 

May we be people who recognize the One who saves and submit our lives to His glory. 

 

About the Author: Lisa Da Silva is a wife, mom of two teenagers, and advocate for women to love God with their heart, soul and mind as they engage in responsible study of His Word.  She writes, speaks, and teaches the Bible to anyone who will read or listen.

Lisa is a teacher by trade and passion, voice for the marginalized, recovering striver, and lover of simplicity, authenticity, and all things pretty. She enjoys thrift store shopping and often has to convince people she’s an introvert.  Just a loud one.

Loving Jesus and making Him known really is her everything.

 

 

Podcast 025 – “Soul Song Coffee: Fostering Empowerment Through Meaningful Work” with Ann Ordway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It began with a spark of hope and a few simple questions: “What if we could multiply a few dollars to keep giving back while we train young teens to start a business from the ground up? What if these young apprentices could explore various aspects of business structure and development and try their hand at developing usable skills? Most importantly, what if they could see the direct impact of their actions in the lives of others both here and across the globe? What if in this process we can help individuals find their soul’s song?”

This spark led the birth of Soul Song Coffee – A company rooted in the belief that meaningful work fosters empowerment, that young people have the ability to build a business, and that a local community can come together to actively practice Biblical truth in a way that demonstrates Christ’s love and promotes lasting change.

Listen to the podcast to learn more about Ann Ordway, the vision behind Soul Song Coffee, and how you, too, can find and live your soul song.

Be sure to visit the Soul Song Coffee website to read about the ways they empower local youth, come alongside ministries in Uganda and Haiti, and source beans from farms and companies that employ sustainable practice and embrace dignity.

Click here to support Soul Song by purchasing coffee directly from their website. I’m a monthly subscriber and genuinely look forward to receiving my beans each month!

May we all heed Ann’s encouragement from Isaiah 41, get on our bike, and start riding.

With great expectation,

Lisa

Soul Song Coffee’s young entrepreneurs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Our Guest: As the Founder of Soul Song Coffee, Ann Ordway wears quite a few hats, but her favorite jobs in the world are being wife to Jason and mama to four amazing kids whom she has the privilege of homeschooling.

Her greatest moments are spent discussing the finer points of life with friends, journaling in her morning prayer time, and capturing most everything in picture! She has an inquisitive spirit and a passion for developing young minds, which ultimately led to the development of Soul Song Coffee!
She dreamed of an opportunity where young teens could be exposed to different careers and aspects of business in a setting where they could immediately apply that learning to a real business, one that existed for the greater good. Not just an idea, an action.

 

20 Things God is Showing Me Through Quarantine

Quarantine.

Just saying the word makes me cringe and immediately paints mental pictures of disease, isolation and people in hermetically sealed rooms. As a self-professed germophobe in regular life, this whole COVID-19 situation has taken things to a whole new level. Anyone else’s hands taking on the appearance of reptile skin from the constant washing, disinfecting and sanitizing? 

All humor aside, the last two weeks have certainly been a learning experience for me. As a creature of habit and one who loves routine and structure, having my daily life basically turned upside-down in a matter of days has really thrown me for a loop (and all the people said, “AMEN”). Amidst so much change, anxiety, and uncertainty, Psalm 91:3-6 has been resonating so deeply with me: 

3 Surely he will save you
from the fowler’s snare
and from the deadly pestilence.
4  He will cover you with his feathers,
and under his wings you will find refuge;
his faithfulness will be your shield and rampart.
5  You will not fear the terror of night,
nor the arrow that flies by day,
6  nor the pestilence that stalks in the darkness,
nor the plague that destroys at midday.

As I was working from home the other morning, the Lord sparked an idea for me to start making a list of all the things He’s revealing to me during this time. It’s by no means comprehensive, as I’m sure He will continue to add to it throughout the duration of this quarantine (cringe) and hopefully long afterward. 

So here they are – 20 things I’ve learned (so far) during quarantine:

 

I am not nearly as patient as I thought I was. Not even remotely.

 I don’t know how to relax.

My “to-do” list runs my life.

 My “priorities” are not necessarily the right ones.

I am not in control. I’ll say that one again…I am NOT in control.

I don’t act like I trust God, even though I say that I do.

I am being given (or gifted) an opportunity for time with my daughter that I will NEVER get back.

My creativity and playfulness get squandered by my constant “need” to be doing something “productive.” The chores ain’t going anywhere…go play with your kid.

I am stronger than I give myself credit for.

As the mother of a toddler, there is never a “good” time to read my Bible. I have to learn to read through the noise.

My home is absolutely my comfort zone.

I have WAY too many things that hold God-like weight in my life. Some of the “inconveniences” of this quarantine are really idols in disguise.

Jesus really does want to be invited into EVERY aspect of my life, including the mundane day-to-day things. But the key is to extend the invitation.

SO much of parenting is consistency. I am NOT consistent.

Even introverts need people and community.

Things like fresh air, spring colors, and birds singing are life-giving in a time when everything feels heavy.

I need to be much more aware of what I’m filling my time (and my head) with.

My daughter is not an adult, so I can’t expect her to communicate like one. Toddlers have bad days, too.

After getting a taste of a slower-paced schedule, I’m not sure that I want things to go back to normal. Maybe God is showing us His desire for a NEW normal, one that allows us the time to consistently commune with Him.

Despite the world seemingly coming to a standstill, the morning continues to come, and the night still follows it. Spring still follows winter, and summer is still on its way. And His mercies are still new every. Single. Day.

 

I pray that we (myself included) would see this situation as an opportunity to really start to peel back some layers and allow the Holy Spirit to reveal our areas for growth (maybe in areas we didn’t even know existed or that we needed). 

I would love to know – What is the Lord teaching YOU during this time? Keep our list going on social media or comment below.

Learning right beside you,

Ali

About Ali Gadbaugh: Born and raised in the Pacific Northwest, Ali is a homebody who counts coffee, her husband and daughter, and Jesus as a few of her favorite things. She likes to add a little sarcasm and humor to life, and is passionate about growing and deepening her relationship with her Savior. 

 

Join Us Live Via Zoom For “Deliverance During Trial: An Inductive Study of Daniel 3”

Several weeks ago, we at Arise decided to look into the Old Testament prophets for our monthly Inductive Bible Study.  We’ve been meeting with a group of women in a home, and it’s been so lovely to watch them dig into the Word and have a desire to truly engage with the Bible and study it together. I was scheduled to lead the group for our March session.

The third chapter of Daniel came to my mind and I began to study it and prepare. It’s a familiar story of three men, a fiery furnace and a God who delivers. The trial they were facing was a fire, but we all face trials.

Little did I know that COVID-19 would become a wild fire in our state of Washington.  This is a trial for each of us as we navigate daily life in a way we never have before. One big impact is that we can no longer meet in groups. We are so thankful for technology that is going to allow us to continue to meet virtually using this link!

Use this link to join us live via Zoom on Monday, March 23, from 7-9pm.  A few us will be online at 6:45pm to welcome you and help you get ready.

Click on the images below to print the Scripture Observation Worksheet and Key Words. A summary of the Inductive Bible Study Method is available as well. You’ll also want to bring some colored pencils/pens and your Bible. Follow us on Instagram and Facebook for updates, and feel free to invite friends.

We’re excited to study the Word and the character of our God who delivers together.

In Him,

Lee Ann

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lee Anne HeadshotAbout Our Leader: Lee Ann DeRoos is a simple girl who loves jeans, sweatshirts, decaf coffee and dark chocolate. She is a servant, learner, worshiper, gluten-free baker, hobby farmer, and Arise Ministries Collective Board Member. Lee Ann is a wife, mom of two, and daughter of the King – Always striving to get out from under her bushel to let His light shine.

 

Podcast 024 – “Unexpected Homeschool Mom: How to Survive (and Thrive) During Covid-19 Closures”

“Children are not a distraction from the more important work, they are the most important work.” – Dr. John Trainer

Let’s be honest. We just weren’t prepared for this. Mamas and caregivers around the world are suddenly  responsible for educating their children at home with limited experience or resources. Even with school districts posting lessons and offering support, we need help with the basics. That’s why we called on Angie Forrester, homeschooling mother of five with nearly a decade of experience. We hope you’ll listen and be encouraged as she shares tools and ideas to help us thrive during the COVID-19 school closure.

Scroll down to find a summary of things we discussed, additional helpful strategies, as well as direct links to some of the resources Angie mentions.

 

From Surviving to Thriving: 6 Strategies to Help You Succeed

Create Routine – Children thrive in structure and need consistency. So do we. It’s good to know what to expect each day, especially when things around us seem unpredictable. Create a schedule using your child’s input if at all possible. Kids often respond to change and expectations better when they’re part of the process and feel ownership. Be sensitive to what’s working and what’s not as the days (and weeks) go by, and feel the freedom to make adjustments.

Foster Character Through Responsibility – Giving your child chores to complete during the day not only keeps your house tidy and organized, but cultivates responsibility. He or she will soon learn that others in the home depend on their hard work and effort. If you have multiple children, consider rotating responsibilities to ensure that everyone gets a chance to try something new. We also hope you’ll allow your son or daughter the opportunity to manage their own time and make decisions independent of you during this season at home. Responsibility is often learned behavior that comes through experience. Use positive reinforcement to encourage helpful behavior whenever able. You’ll be surprised at how quick your child rises to the occasion!

Provide a Space for Optimal Learning – Angie suggests giving each child a personal space to keep their school books and supplies. This may be as simple as giving them their own area on a bookshelf, desk, or table. For kids that work better on the move, consider a rolling system like the ones in the link below. Angie’s three younger students prefer this method. One of their actual rolling carts is featured in the image to the left. Whichever method you end up using, encourage your son or daughter to be responsible for his or her space just like they are at school. It should be tidied up in the evening and ready for learning in morning. They may even begin to enjoy using and taking care of their new school area and resources!

Reframe Expectations – Our frustration and disappointment is often caused by unrealistic or unspoken expectations. Remember that everyone in the home is experiencing a new reality. We’re not used to being around one another for extended amounts of time. Angie reminds us that our own selfishness often gets in the way of optimal learning. Take some time every day to surrender your will to our Father. While self-care is always important, acknowledge that regular alone time may be less feasible in this season. You and your children are learning new rhythms together!

Give Grace – Understand that your children may be suffering, too. They’re not used to being home and learning from their mom. They may miss friends and all of the learning and social benefits they experienced at school. Both of you are first-timers, and both of you need grace for one another. We think it’s ok (and advantageous even) to be honest about your fears and trepidation. Maybe your children want to share their own with you. Be willing to say sorry and commit each day to prayer. We’re all going to need it.

Make Memories! – You have always been your child’s primary teacher. While we know that this is a season of hardship for many, our prayer is that you would enjoy this unexpected gift of time as much as possible. Take a moment each day to make a memory! Go on a nature walk. Bake something together. Write letters and put them in the mail. Learn a new instrument. Snuggle on the sofa and read a novel out loud. Make small care packages and anonymously drop them off on a neighbor or friend’s porch. Paint. Play board games. Document this adventure in a journal. Do a Bible study together. Linger at the table after meals. Do whatever you can to make positive memories and leave a legacy of the way your family tackled the COVID-19 homeschool season.

 

Active Learning Activities and Supplies

 

Suggested Picture Books and Novels to Read Aloud

 

Click here for a direct link to our Recommended Resources page where you can find Gospel-centered children’s books and resources to encourage and equip moms from a Biblical perspective.

Websites with Free Printables, Online Support, and Suggested Activities

Khan Academy

Read Aloud Revival (great book lists)

Board Slam (free printable)

Classroom Freebies (reading logs and worksheets)

Virtual Field Trips

 

Closing Thoughts

Our hope and prayer is that you would cling to the hope in Christ as you navigate this season of life at home. May these suggestions and resources bring calm and clarity, and may you rest in the unwavering truth that you truly are the very best teacher your children have.

With great expectation,

Angie and Lisa

Meet Our Authors

About Angie Forrester: A northwest native, Angie enjoys spending her time cultivating gardens and young minds including her five “free-range” children.  She has been a home educator for 9 years, working alongside other mamas to build community for homeschool families.  As a lifelong learner you may find her reciting Latin, reading aloud to her children, or applying National Park stickers to her water bottle from her most recent adventure.

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Lisa Da Silva: Lisa has never (ever) officially homeschooled her children, and is increasingly thankful that her kids are young adults with online programs mandated by their schools. She is passionate about education and loved being an elementary school teacher before starting a family. She is honored to be the Director of Arise Ministries Collective, and longs to see women transformed by the gospel of Jesus Christ. She is willing and ready to come alongside all of the young mama’s unexpectedly at home during this season.

Printable Resource – “Quiet Waters: Poems and Scripture for Reflection and Prayer” by Kelsi Folsom

Poetry is one of the earliest art forms. Scholars believe poetry originated in Persia, much like opera originated in Italy. It is a way to connect our souls with the Creator of all things, and to express the depths of our human experience that can feel like “too much” for narration. As we intentionally engage our five senses with the “right now” world around us, we can grow a greater awareness of the richness of God’s presence and the abundance of I Am’s grace. The practice of poetry is somewhat ecstatic, as it is an overflow of the heart and mind. When I really “get in the groove” it feels a bit like swimming in a divine river, and I’m not sure sure where the twists and turns will take me, but I trust the one who is guiding me. Writing poetry is a time to let go and allow our minds to make whatever leaps they want to. I think of it as a way to bring our ashes to the Lord and receive his beauty in return (Isaiah 61:3). 

I hope and pray your soul is renewed through the work of this mini devotional, and that old dreams and new dreams find some fresh inspiration. I am passionate about poetry and connecting with the spirit of the Lord in order to strengthen our faith and spur us on to love and good deeds (Hebrews 10:24). I Am is closer than you think. 

Peace be with you,

Kelsi Folsom

 

To download your own printable copy of Quiet Waters: Poems for Reflection and Prayer, click here.

More of Kelsi’s poetry is available in her recently published book, Buried in the Marginsas well on on her website.

From Amazon: “Wife of a medical school student and mom to three young children, navigates marriage, motherhood, faith, and repatriation in this beautifully rendered collection of poems spanning oceans, continents, and landscapes of the heart. From finding first love and becoming a parent, surviving the eye of the strongest Atlantic Hurricane in recorded history, Irma, to rebuilding a marriage after being separated by an ocean for 7 months, opera singer Kelsi Folsom bares the depths of her soul in these life-affirming poems. With ferocity and vulnerability, Buried in the Margins will take you on an exciting, hope-filled journey you will never forget.”

 

About Kelsi Folsom: Kelsi is a wife and mom to three navigating marriage, motherhood, and a husband in medical school with the assistance of black coffee, cozy slippers, Leontyne Price recordings, and a whole lot of prayer. She loves connecting with and encouraging women to experience the divine grace and presence of God in their everyday lives through what they already love to do. Her essays and poems are published in Mothers Always Write, the DC-Area Moms Blog, Motherly, The Caribbean Writer, Women Who Live on Rocks, Voice of Eve, and elsewhere. She is the author of poetry collection Buried in the Margins, and is a regular contributor to Red Tent Living an online, faith-based women’s publication. She enjoys traveling with her family, scouring estate sales, getting lost in a good novel, and occasionally putting her B.M. in Voice Performance to good use. You can find her on Instagram, Facebook, and at her website.

 


Arise Ministries Collective exists to equip women with Biblical truth so they are empowered to love God, love others, and live in radical and beautiful ways for Christ.If you want to see every woman engaged by scripture in a way that saves and compels, consider making a tax deductible gift to support the overhead costs of this ministry. Be sure to include your personal information so we can send you a tax receipt for your donation.

Podcast 023 – “Buried in the Margins: A Quieting Practice for Bible Reflection” with Kelsi Folsom

What would happen if we, like David in the Psalms, bore our most intimate revelations, struggles, fears, joys, and thanksgiving before the Lord – Uninhibited and free? How can we begin to quiet our spirit, uncover feeling, and respond to Scripture in a way that transforms and unearths that which we’d rather keep hidden?

When today’s podcast guest began writing poetry in Middle School, she never anticipated one day sharing her soulful words with others. As an adult experiencing the newness of marriage, motherhood and unexpected twists and turns, Kelsi Folsom realized her poetry could help other women feel seen and hopeful. As someone living in light of Scripture and wholeheartedly embracing her calling as a daughter of Christ, Kelsi believes poetry can enhance our prayer lives and become an intimate response to what we’re reading and studying in the Bible.

Her vulnerability and candor bring a gritty and welcome light to feelings and struggles many of us as women have, but may find difficulty putting into words.

Our prayer is that this conversation, the accompanying downloadable devotional, and Kelsi’s book, Buried in the Margins will help each one of us practice wholehearted surrender and bring glory to God through the creativity of our words.

To download your own printable copy of Kelsi’s devotional, Quiet Waters: Poems for Reflection and Prayer, click here. More of Kelsi’s poetry is available in her recently published book, Buried in the Marginsas well on on her website.

From Amazon: “Wife of a medical school student and mom to three young children, navigates marriage, motherhood, faith, and repatriation in this beautifully rendered collection of poems spanning oceans, continents, and landscapes of the heart. From finding first love and becoming a parent, surviving the eye of the strongest Atlantic Hurricane in recorded history, Irma, to rebuilding a marriage after being separated by an ocean for 7 months, opera singer Kelsi Folsom bares the depths of her soul in these life-affirming poems. With ferocity and vulnerability, Buried in the Margins will take you on an exciting, hope-filled journey you will never forget.”

About Our Guest: Kelsi Folsom is a wife and mom to three navigating marriage, motherhood, and a husband in medical school with the assistance of black coffee, cozy slippers, Leontyne Price recordings, and a whole lot of prayer. She loves connecting with and encouraging women to experience the divine grace and presence of God in their everyday lives through what they already love to do. Her essays and poems are published in Mothers Always Write, the DC-Area Moms Blog, Motherly, The Caribbean Writer, Women Who Live on Rocks, Voice of Eve, and elsewhere. She is the author of poetry collection Buried in the Margins, and is a regular contributor to Red Tent Living an online, faith-based women’s publication. She enjoys traveling with her family, scouring estate sales, getting lost in a good novel, and occasionally putting her B.M. in Voice Performance to good use. You can find her on Instagram, Facebook, and at her website.

 

 

 

Arise Ministries Collective exists to equip women with Biblical truth so they are empowered to love God, love others, and live in radical and beautiful ways for Christ.

If you want to see every woman engaged by scripture in a way that saves and compels, consider making a tax deductible gift to support the overhead costs of this ministry. Be sure to include your personal information so we can send you a tax receipt for your donation.


 

 

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